Tag Archives: trans justice

Remembrance, Resilience, and Resistance

Artwork reading "Trans People Exist in the Future"

Artwork by Kah Yangni (@kahyangni on Instagram | www.kahyangni.com) and Forward Together (@fwdtogether)

November 20th is Trans Day of Remembrance & Resilience. It’s a day to honor the legacies of our trans and nonbinary people who were taken from the world due to violence, discrimination, and hate. As we remember and honor their lives by saying their names with love and respect, it is a reminder that we shall continue to find ways of giving love and standing for trans justice everywhere.

In the last year, more than 350 reported transgender and non-binary lives have been taken worldwide due to anti-trans violence, discrimination, and hate. 51 of these deaths were in the U.S., and of these, most of the reported deaths are Black trans women. And the actual numbers of lives we’ve lost are likely higher than reported because so many trans people are marginalized, misgendered, misidentified, or unaccounted for even in death.

The year 2020 has been especially tough as the world continues to grapple with a pandemic that impacts our trans and non-binary communities who already fight for access to healthcare. Though Trans Day of Remembrance specifically focuses on murders of trans people, we have lost many this year to the rapid spread of COVID-19, including irreplaceable community figures like Lorena Borjas. The neglectful response to the pandemic by our federal government; the broken institutions that demand workers choose between exposure to the virus or losing their income; the homelessness, hunger, isolation, and poverty that are rampant among trans people and those who are considered disposable–these, too, are violence. Just like individuals motivated by ignorance and hatred, these systems take lives every day.

The impacts of these deaths on the families, friends, communities, and loved ones left behind are immeasurable.

In these moments of honoring the lives of those taken from us too soon, we also invite you to celebrate the trans communities that continue to exist every single day. Express your gratitude towards trans and non-binary folx in your life. Be kind to yourself and to others every chance you get. Remind yourself that what we have is each other, and that no one is disposable.

Even in a world that tries to erase, eradicate, and diminish our light, our communities remain powerful. Within this resistance there is a brilliant resilience and legacy.

To keep this life-sustaining work going, we encourage everyone to donate within their capacity or volunteer with a local, trans-led group. We’ve compiled a list of all 261 of our 2020 grantees to help serve as a guide to where you can donate and share at.

To learn about how we can demand trans liberation, especially for our Black Trans Women and Black Trans Femmes, please check out Transgender Law Center’s website for the Trans Agenda For Liberation.

Our lives and communities are part of the legacy of trans justice that strengthens our resilience and fuels our resistance. Let us remember, celebrate, and uplift those we’ve lost and honor the ones who are still here. Together we build this legacy of trans justice where trans and nonbinary folks will not only survive, but will thrive, free to live and to love.

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Happy Trans Awareness Week from TJFP!

Image: Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson

Happy Trans Awareness Week! Were you aware that…

– For every $100 awarded by U.S. foundations, only .04 cents supports transgender communities.

– In 2016, a survey of 455 trans justice groups across the globe found that only half of these groups had any paid staff at all–meaning that the rest are doing life-saving work with little to no compensation.

– Trans organizations often operate with very low budgets: three-quarters of our grantees in 2019 had annual budgets under $50,000, as did three-quarters of the groups worldwide from the survey above.

 

Are you also aware that…

– Trans community, trans activism, and trans leadership have persisted throughout time. Grassroots, BIPOC- and trans-led groups like STAR (co-founders Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson pictured above) have worked to feed, house, and care for our trans siblings for decades. Despite so many barriers to resources, we have fought with ferocity and love, and we will continue to do so!

– You can discover more about our amazing grantees through our website’s interactive map and lists of grantees from our 8 years of funding! No matter the political changes occurring on the national stage, the grassroots are where the effects will be felt–and where so much of the vital work will be done. Take a look at the work that’s happening in your area. We encourage you to donate, volunteer, or do what you can to support!

 

Sources:

Funders for LGBTQ Issues–2018 Tracking Report

American Jewish World Service, Astraea, and Global Action for Trans Equality–The State of Trans Organizing, 2nd Edition

Trans Justice Funding Project–2019 Annual Report

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Young, Gifted, and Black: We Fight Back!

Artwork by Glori Tuitt, @glorifice_

Beloved Community, Family, and Friends, 

It would be impossible for us as grantmakers to ignore what’s happening in the United States right now. There is no way to overstate how vital Black trans lives have been to the Trans Justice Funding Project, to the grassroots trans organizers we serve, to the trans justice movement as a whole. Unequivocally, absolutely, Black Lives Matter!

TJFP is a Black, Brown, and Indigenous-led organization that has continuously prioritized moving resources across the country to support Black trans groups and organizations, while centering their experiences and leadership. It is an honor and a moral duty to do so.

It’s notable that over the past several days there have been endless conversations and messaging discrediting activists and protestors, which avoids addressing the real conversation at hand, state sanctioned anti-black violence carried out by police. This is a tactic to sway us away from focusing on accountability and it is unacceptable. The systems that are literally killing us must be dismantled. And they must be defunded.

At TJFP we believe there is no world in which trans liberation can occur without racial justice. There cannot be Pride for a few when there is violence, repression, and injustice for so many. Some of us owe our very existence to the visions, strategies, and radical courage of organizers of the past and today. 

We must honor this legacy and support Black trans leaders to lead, to organize, to envision, as they build a better tomorrow for us all. So many of the groups we fund are made up of trans people of color working within their local communities, providing direct services and resources to cover gaps or repair harms inflicted by state systems like the police. Trans justice looks like transformative justice, like gender justice, like prison abolition and anti-policing work, like disability justice, like economic justice, like solidarity with racial justice organizations, like Black trans leadership leading the way. 

We protect us. These systems were not designed with the intention of our freedom. And protection was never meant for us, not in a nation built on the oppression of Black people on stolen land. We see the need, year after year, read it in application after application, the impact of militarization, surveillance, and policing on Black bodies, on Black trans bodies, on trans bodies of color across the nation. Tony McDade. Nina Pop. Layleen Polanco Xtravaganza. And countless others, casualties of a system that values property and “business as usual” over justice, dignity, and human life.

To the Black leaders who are doing this work, thank you. Thank you for your time and your energy, your brilliance and your strength, your anger and your love. Thank you for being Black excellence in all the ways you may not even realize. Please survive this in any way you can.  To the rest of our TJFP family, we encourage you to find Black-led organizations in your area to consider funding them directly. Our interactive map and our lists of grantees can tell you more about trans-led organizations in your area to aid you in your research.

 

In love and solidarity, 

The staff at TJFP 

 

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Introducing 2020 TJFP Community Grantmaking Fellow, Emmett Schelling!

We’re thrilled to introduce our sixth and final Community Grantmaking Fellow, Emmett Schelling!

Emmett is a South Korean trans immigrant by way of foreign adoption who leads the largest statewide trans led advocacy org in Texas. While his primary focus of work is on trans issues, his passion and understanding that individuals at their wholest and fullest are not impacted by single issues, but rather a myriad of issues that often manifest themselves in oppression and marginalization.

Before entering into movement/nonprofit work he came from corporate management after studying Business Management and Marketing in college. He felt compelled to invest deeper into the ongoing work towards collective liberation of trans folks after taking on various levels of community organizing and engagement combined with a series of eye opening events that pulled him into the work he currently does.

As well as currently serving as the Executive Director of Transgender Education Network of Texas (TENT) Emmett serves on the Community Council for Transform Houston, is a board member of Deeds Not Words, is a Co-Director for the TransFORWARD, a statewide trans powered research collective in Texas.

We can’t wait to build with you Emmett!

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Introducing 2020 TJFP Community Grantmaking Fellow, Nicole Fernandes!

We’re over the moon about the fifth of our six 2020 TJFP grantmaking fellows, Nicole Fernandes!

Nicole Fernandes is a South Asian Trans Woman new to the world of philanthropy. She comes from a more direct service and grassroots background, having worked at the LGBT Center of New York, and participating as a fellow at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. Currently, she is the Finance and Administrative Associate at Funders for LGBTQ Issues where she is beginning her career in philanthropy. Nicole finds joy in binge watching shows with her sisters and making a mess with acrylic paints.

Thank you for bringing your wisdom and generosity to this years grantmaking process!

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Introducing 2020 TJFP Community Grantmaking Fellow, Christopher Cuevas!

TJFP is so excited to introduce the second of our six Community Grantmaking Fellows, Christopher Cuevas!

Christopher Cuevas is the Executive Director of QLatinx and provides vision, energy, and leadership in the fulfillment of the mission and vision of the organization, working to advance the visibility of and empower LGBTQ+ Latinx communities and create spaces that foster growth and healing.

A lifelong peace practitioner, educator, and community organizer, Christopher leads their work for cultural transformation by centering the unapologetic and unwavering power of radical love. A child of undocumented immigrants and a queer person of color, Christopher interconnects their lived experience and drives the necessary heart work of building a culture of peace, compassion, and change through advocating for LGBTQ+, immigrant, and racial justice movements.

Through their work with state, national, and transnationally recognized initiatives and organizations, Christopher has led conversations and facilitated education campaigns specifically addressing structural racism, health equity, and LGBTQ+ issues.

Thank you for saying YES to joining TJFP’s community grantmaking team this year!

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We have the skills, the spirit, and experience to survive this…

Dear friends, family, and community,

TJFP is holding you, our community, and family in our minds and hearts during this particularly challenging moment.

These are indeed scary times, as the COVID-19 pandemic has brought the world to a screeching halt.  The world looks very different today than it did even a week ago.

For many of our grantees, applicants, and community, there has never been a busier time.

Many of us are grappling with how to keep going and providing answers and solutions with urgency. Our communities–which often include those we consider family–are in great need of support, connection, healing, shelter, mutual aid and resources. The deep sense of worry is real.

TJFP is also concerned about the well being and livelihood of individuals, organizations and those most marginalized and isolated.

There is so much we are all holding collectively and there is so much we do not yet know.

But here’s something we do know…

While the phrase “We’re all in this together” has quickly become a popular hashtag and is a sentiment shared widely in the media, knowing the value of caring for our communities has been a commitment, a practice and a way of life for our communities for a long, long time.  “We’re all in this together” is a politic many of us have been forced to commit to or have chosen to believe in before COVID-19.  Some of us are experts in surviving so much, that it’s been passed on to us by our ancestors and remains alive in our very own DNA.

Grassroots organizing, and the individuals that make them what they are, show up constantly to fill the gaps and failures our systems have left us with. Below, we’ve provided important links to efforts organized and supported by TJFP’s 2019 grantees. As much as they need us to show up for them, we need them for our collective survival.  Grassroots movements are essential.

TJFP will remain committed to showing up for our folks without burdening them.

We will continue to move money directly to grassroots, trans-led groups across the US, with as few strings attached as possible, as we have always done.

In response to the COVID-19 crisis, we will be moving more money in 2020 to trans justice groups than originally planned, while also supplying our TJFP community-led grantmaking fellow alumni with an emergency fund.

TJFP has also joined an emergency response effort with the Third Wave Fund, Borealis’s Fund for Trans Generations, Funders for LGBT Issues’s Grantmakers United for Trans Community, and Wellspring. More information about that fund will be released early next week.

It is with great hope that you will be patient, kind, and generous with each other during these tender times. The load will be heavy and the loss will be significant and yet we will find a way. For those of you wondering how you can help, we ask you to please support grassroots efforts however possible.

Friends, family, and beloved community, we have the skills, the spirit and experience to survive this. For those of you who can, please check in on your people.  Extending love, grace, appreciation and authentic support is what will get us through.

With gratitude and great care,



 

 

Arkansas Transgender Equity Collaborative
Little Rock, AR
Donate to community relief giving circle

No Justice No Pride
Washington, DC
Requesting food, cleaning/hygiene supplies, volunteers for patient advocacy, funds for emergency microgrants, instacart giftcards

Black & Indigenous Transgender Safehaus (B.I.T.S.)
Washington, DC
Donate to support trans students

Trans Women of Color Collective
Washington, DC
Donate to survival fund

Unity Coalition|Coalicion Unida
MIAMI BEACH, FL
Donate to support fund for folks in hospitality industry in South Florida

Brave Space Alliance
Chicago, IL
Volunteer for food pantry
Donate to food pantry

Louisiana Trans Advocates
Baton Rouge, LA
Donate to TGNC Crisis Funding Circle Louisiana
In lieu of gatherings, send letters against anti-trans legislation

Metro Trans Umbrella Group
St. Louis, MO
Donate food and disinfectant

Trans Queer Flat STL
St. Louis, MO
Donate food and supplies

Black Trans Media
Brooklyn, NY
Donate food, supplies, or money

Colectivo intercultural TRANSgrediendo / CITG
Jackson Heights, NY
Donate to Transgender Emergency Fund

Black Queer & Intersectional Collective
Columbus, OH
Donate to BQIC Emergency Fund

Hearts on a Wire
Philadelphia, PA
Be a pen pal for an incarcerated LGBTQ individual

sisTers PGH
Pittsburgh, PA
Donate to Pittsburgh LGBTQIA Emergency Relief Fund

Latinas Trans Austin
Houston, TX
Donate to Houston LGBTQI Latinx fund

Trans Pride Initiative
Dallas, TX
Volunteer to provide mutual aid

Nationz Foundation
Richmond, VA
Donate to food pantry

Trans Women of Color Solidarity Network
Seattle, WA
Donate to Trans Women of Color Solidarity Network Fund


 

 

 

Unity Coalition|Coalicion Unida
MIAMI BEACH, FL
Apply for hospitality industry fund

Brave Space Alliance
Chicago, IL
Request food or other supplies

Metro Trans Umbrella Group
St. Louis, MO
Food and supplies available for pickup, home donations also available

Trans Pride Initiative
Dallas, TX
Contact to access food pantry

Stonewall Youth
Olympia, WA
Organization is offering to purchase supplies for youth 12-24


 

 

 

Masjid al-Rabia
Chicago, IL
Online support groups and prayer services

Portland Outright
Portland, ME
In person programming has moved online

Transformations
Kansas City, MO
Support groups now online, see Facebook page for specific groups
TDOV Virtual Resource Fair

Tranzmission
Asheville, NC
Support groups now moving online

QTPoC Mental Health
Portland, OR
Collection of helpful links and online community

Borderland Rainbow Center
El Paso, TX
Teletherapy and virtual support groups available, see Facebook page for specific options

Nationz Foundation
Richmond, VA
Call the office to access support group

Out in the Open
Brattleboro, VT
Join rural LGBTQ virtual hangouts


 

 

 

QLatinx
Orlando, FL
Healing through community storytelling

Transcend the Binary
Ferndale, MI
Quarantine and Chill queer film streaming

House of Pentacles
Durham, NC
Offered free virtual healing gathering

Transgender Assistance Program of Virginia – TAPVA
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Digital TDOV celebration

Out in the Open
Brattleboro, VT
Submission requests for QuaranZine

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Applications are open for 2020 grants!

It’s that time again! Time for grassroots, trans-led, trans justice groups to apply for funding and for those of us who can, to donate what we can to support their work.  Please help us spread the word! The application is currently available in English and Spanish.

Please make sure to read our guidelines first to determine if your group is eligible.


 

Is Your Group Eligible for a TJFP Grant?

  • Are you a group?
  • Are you a grassroots, trans justice group run by and for trans people?
  • Is your group’s total budget less than $250,000?
  • Are you located in the United States or a U.S. territory?
  • Are you centering the leadership of trans people organizing around their experiences with racism, economic injustice, transmisogyny, ableism, immigration, incarceration, and other intersecting oppressions?
  • Are you meeting the needs of different local communities and using organizing and/or providing services to help bring people together?
  • Do you see your work as part of a bigger picture of trans-led work that seeks dignity and justice for all people?

* TJFP does not fund individuals.
* You do not need to be a 501c3 non-profit or have a fiscal sponsor to apply!

How Much Money is TJFP Giving Away?

Grants range in size and the more money we raise by May, the more we can give away! Every penny we raise goes to our grantees with no restrictions and no strings attached because we truly believe in trusting and supporting trans leadership. Our 2020 goal is to give away at least 750,000 dollars with grant sizes of $2500, $5000, and $10,000.

Deadline

The deadline to apply is February 15th, 2020 by midnight Eastern Standard Time. Decisions will be made at the end of May 2020, so you can expect to hear back from us by early June 2020.

Translation & Accessibility

The application is currently available in English and Spanish.

Please email us at admin@transjusticefundingproject.org by January 15th if you need a translated version in another language of the application.

We aim to make this process as accessible as possible, so please let us know about any other needs you have and we will do our best to meet them.

¡Las solicitudes ya están disponibles para las subvenciones del 2020 del Proyecto de Financiamiento de Justicia Trans (TJFP)!

TJFP es iniciativa comunitaria de financiamiento fundada en 2012 para apoyar grupos comunitarias de justicia trans dirigidos por y para personas trans. Hacemos becas anualmente por organizar un comité de seis activistas de justicia trans de todo el país para revisar cuidadosamente cada solicitud que recibimos.

¿Es elegible su grupo para una beca de TJFP?

  • ¿Es un grupo?
  •  ¿Es grupo comunitario de justicia trans dirigido por y para personas trans?
  • ¿El presupuesto total de su grupo es menos que $250,000?
  • ¿Está ubicado en los Estados Unidos o en Territorios de los Estados Unidos?
  • ¿Su grupo se enfoca en el liderazgo de personas trans organizando sobre sus experiencias con racismo, injusticia económica, trans-misoginia, capacitismo, inmigración, encarcelamiento, y otras opresiones interseccional?
  • ¿Satisface las necesidades de diferentes comunidades locales y organiza y/o provee servicios para unir las personas
  • ¿Considera su trabajo parte de una panorama general de trabajo dirigido por las personas trans para dignidad y justicia para todas personas?

TJFP no da becas a individuos.

¡No necesitas estatus sin fines de lucro 501c3, ni necesitas patrocinio fiscal tampoco para solicitar!

¿Cuánto dinero está donando el TJFP?

Las becas varían en tamaño.  Cuanto más recaudamos  más podemos regalar! Cada centavo que recaudamos va a nuestros beneficiarios sin restricciones ni condiciones tampoco porque creemos sinceramente en confiar en y apoyar al liderazgo trans.

Fecha límite

La fecha límite para solicitar es la 15 de febrero de 2020 por la medianoche EST. Decidiremos a finales de May 2020. Entonces, planea tener la respuesta de nosotrxs para Junio 2020.

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Remembering and Honoring Trans Resilience

Art by Kah Yangni in collaboration with Forward Together

Today, November 20th, is Trans Day of Remembrance & Resilience.  It’s a day to lift up our trans community members near and far, say the names of those we’ve lost, and honor the legacy of our people. More than 300 reported transgender, gender non-conforming, and non-binary lives have been taken worldwide due to anti-trans violence, discrimination, and hate. 37 of these deaths occurred in the US, and of these, most of the reported deaths are Black trans women. The actual numbers of lives we’ve lost are likely higher because so many trans people are marginalized, misidentified, or unaccounted for even in death. 

The impacts of these deaths on the families, friends, communities, and loved ones left behind are immeasurable. 

On this day and every day, we want to honor the lives of those who have been taken from us and celebrate the trans communities that continue to exist every single day. Even in a world that tries to erase, eradicate, and diminish our light, our communities remain powerful. Within this resistance there is a brilliant resilience and legacy. 

Wherever you are, we honor you. Let’s shout out to the grassroots trans justice activists and organizers out there who are keeping our communities safe and alive every day. Let’s uplift the cultural workers and artists who share our stories and create a radical vision of what a future of trans liberation could look like. Let’s thank the stars for our trans elders for showing us the way, being our guide. 

Our movement is growing as more people create bold solutions and systems of support to alleviate the needs that are still unmet in their communities. This year, 96 of our applicants were groups we had never heard from before, some already active for many years, others for only a few. Among our 2019 grantees are groups that bail incarcerated trans immigrants out of detention, provide housing for trans folks, invest in training and developing the leadership of Black and brown trans people, and create spaces for trans people to come together and share food, art, and joy. These groups keep trans people alive, when the world says time and time again that their lives are disposable, and often do this work on shoestring budgets or entirely for free. This is what trans resilience looks like.

To keep this life-sustaining work going, we encourage everyone to donate within their capacity or volunteer with a local, trans-led groups. We’ve compiled a list of all 186 of our 2019 grantees here to help serve as a guide. 

For a list of specific ways to focus our movements on ending violence against trans women of color, we also recommend this piece by Raquel Willis, editor of Out Magazine.

Our lives and communities are part of a legacy of trans justice that strengthens our resilience and fuels our resistance. Today, let’s remember, celebrate, and uplift those we’ve lost and the ones who are still here. In honor of those who have come before us, let’s continue to build this legacy of trans justice together to create our future of trans liberation.

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Behind the Scenes: Thank you to our 2019 Grantmaking Coordination Team!

Coming off of a very full grantmaking weekend of trans justice in action, we’re feeling extremely grateful for every applicant, grantee, grantmaking Fellow, and the behind the scenes team who’s been holding it down over the last several months.

The Trans Justice Funding Project is cared for, tended to, and loved by some of the most incredible humans, including many of you!

We want to extend an extra special thank you to our fabulous team of contracted coordinators as they onboard, trained, and cheered on this years Fellows, coordinated countless logistics, and facilitated the heck our seventh grantmaking panel.  We are so lucky we got to work with these folks as they are some of the most talented organizers on the planet! They made community-led grantmaking look eassssssy!  (And it’s not!)

 

Cathy Kapua, Community Grantmaking Fellowship Coordinator

Cathy has worked with the transgender community since 2003, first starting off as a Peer Educator at Kulia Na Mamo, then eventually moving on to become the Transgender Service Manager at the Hawaii Health & Harm Reduction Center. Cathy is proud of her academic accomplishments in the University of Hawaii- West Oahu where she received a B.S. in Public Administration and continues to use these skills to help her Native Hawaiian community. She has been successful in advocating for transgender programming and providing culturally competency trainings throughout the nation but prides herself mainly on being a role model for younger transgender women in Hawai`i.

Cristina Herrera, Community Grantmaking Meeting Coordinator

Cristina founded the Translatina Network back in 2007, in order to organize and empower the transgender immigrant community through leadership development and education. Over the years she has served on countless panels, committees, and boards in order to provide expertise on effective HIV prevention and community organizing. Cristina has been presented with awards and recognition by NYC DOH, The AIDS Institute, City Council , the Queens Borough President and many organizations.

Cristina was formerly the Trans Program Coordinator at the Lesbian, Gay Bisexual & Transgender Community Center (The Center), where she worked for eleven years. She oversaw the workforce development program that is specifically designed to meet the needs of the TGNC community. She has been working in the field of HIV prevention, advocacy and community organizing for almost 20 years.

Glo Ross, TJFP Community Grantmaking Facilitator

Glo Ross is originally from Los Angeles, CA and currently lives in Atlanta, GA. As a full-time gender-queer lover of all animals and the earth, Glo is committed to building the world we all deserve to live in by organizing power in our communities and actively practicing compassion for all beings day to day. Currently, Glo works in the public sector as a policy analyst on environmental issues. In previous lives, Glo directed campaigns at FIERCE! to build power among LGBTQ youth of color in New York City, has helped lead anti-police brutality organizing in Atlanta, and has facilitated numerous youth organizing trainings for college students across the country. In the past eight years, Glo has also supported community-based organizing strategy through technical assistance and issue research. When not facilitating or conducting research, you can find Glo hiking with their pups (two lovable rescued pit bulls), trying out a new vegan recipe, or road-tripping to the beach.

Nico Amador, TJFP Community Grantmaking Facilitator

Nico Amador grew up in California and is now a trainer, organizer and writer based in Philadelphia. Nico got his start as a trainer working with
youth around issues of oppression and leading workshops on the impacts of militarism and the prison industrial complex on people of color. As part of the Fellowship of Reconciliation’s Nonviolent Youth Collective, Nico helped to train volunteers preparing to do human rights work in Colombia, led week-long retreats on nonviolence and social justice, and organized a California arts and education tour.

As part of Training for Change, Nico has led workshops in the US, Canada and Europe for groups such as Choice USA, Iraq Veterans Against the War, the Energy Action Coalition, Greenpeace, the National Youth Advocacy Coalition, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, the Earth Quaker Action Team, the New Sanctuary Movement, Prometheus Radio Project, and the Diverse City Fund.

Nico is also an experienced community organizer who has participated in grassroots efforts for prison abolition, urban farming, and keeping casinos out of residential neighborhoods. Most recently he led a campaign that successfully changed a policy that was causing harassment of transgender riders on Philadelphia’s public transportation system.

He has authored articles such as “Lessons from the Borders: Empowering Participants with Disabilities and Transgender Participants” and “Into the Streets! Training as a Tactic” and has published poetry in a few small journals and anthologies.

 

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